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A Medical Doctor share his experience

Submitted by suntime on Fri, 03/02/2018 - 07:13

Dr. C is a medical doctor who suffered from strabismus (eye turn) and nystagmus (an eye disorder where the eyes move back and forth rapidly out of control).  When he was in medical school he had strabismus surgery.  He had seen numerous eye doctors and optometrists looking for help with his visual difficulties before finding our office.   Here is what he would like to share with you about his experience being evaluated by Neuro-Developmental Optometrist ,Vision Specialist:

Vision and Posture

Submitted by suntime on Fri, 03/02/2018 - 07:12

THE "EYES" HAVE IT

Posted February 28th, 2001 by Matt 

 

 

We don't realize it, but our eyes have a great deal to do with how we stand and move. The eyes feed the brain information about where the body is in relationship to the ground and objects all around us. Different eye positions in the eye socket inform sensors in the brain so the body can adjust its posture.

Visually Guide Motor in speech

Submitted by suntime on Fri, 03/02/2018 - 07:10

Technology recently allowed researchers to switch from 2D to the Opti-Speech technology, which shows the 3D images of the tongue. Credit: University of Texas at Dallas

A new study done by University of Texas (UT) at Dallas researchers indicates that watching 3D images of tongue movements can help individuals learn speech sounds.

According to Dr. William Katz, co-author of the study and professor at UT Dallas' Callier Center for Communication Disorders, the findings could be especially helpful for stroke patients seeking to improve their speech articulation.

Ready for School…but READY to LEARN?

Submitted by suntime on Fri, 03/02/2018 - 05:44

As another school year rolls around I often wonder how many children come to school ready to LEARN?

Most children are up to date on new school clothes, new backpacks and supplies, and physical check-ups. Many do not have one the most essential needs covered…a comprehensive eye examination from an eye care practitioner ?  

Therapy helps to improve stereoscopic vision in stroke patients

Submitted by suntime on Fri, 03/02/2018 - 05:43

Humans view the world through two eyes, but it is our brain that combines the images from each eye to form a single composite picture. If this function becomes damaged, impaired sight can be the result. Such loss of visual function can be observed in patients who have suffered a stroke or traumatic brain injury or when the oxygen supply to the brain has been reduced (cerebral hypoxia). Those affected by this condition experience blurred vision or can start to see double after only a short period of visual effort. Other symptoms can include increased fatigue or headaches.

What’s Really Causing Your Child’s Reading Problem?

Submitted by suntime on Fri, 03/02/2018 - 05:42

As parents, we want the best for our children. We want them to be safe, successful and happy. But for the parent of a child with an undiagnosed functional vision problem, these goals can be frustratingly elusive.

Typically, children who have an undiagnosed functional vision problem struggle with reading and writing. The frustrating part about the condition is that a visit to the eye doctor may not always reveal that there is a problem. In fact, many people with functional vision problems have 20/20 vision and healthy eyes.

What is functional vision?

STROKE VISUAL EXPANSION FIELD

Submitted by suntime on Fri, 03/02/2018 - 05:38

HEMIANOPIA(STROKE OF VIEW)
Hemianopia, also known as Hemianopsia is loss of vision in either the whole left or the whole right half of the field of vision. The most common causes of this damage include the side effect of stroke, brain tumour and trauma. Such vision loss could lead inconveniences in life for instance problems with mobility, tendency to bump into objects, falling incidents, unpredicted accidents and reading difficulties.

ACHROMATOPSIA

Submitted by suntime on Fri, 03/02/2018 - 05:37

We do have supply a special lenses for Achromatopsia , Hemeralopia (Day Blindness) - Extreme Light and Glare Sensitivity.

In order to get a optimum result, you will need to make an appointment to meet our Optometrist in Special interest of this.

The light forces her to squint her eyes in normal room lightDay blindness or hemeralopia can now open her eyes with 
the special lenses.

Dyslexia and Research

Submitted by suntime on Fri, 03/02/2018 - 05:37

NEUROPSYCHOLOGISTS MOST OFTEN CONCLUDE THAT DYSLEXIA IS A LANGUAGE PROCESSING PROBLEM. BRAIN IMAGE STUDIES (FMRI, PET SCAN) SHOW THAT PEOPLE WITH DYSLEXIA SEEM TO PROCESS LANGUAGE INFORMATION IN A DIFFERENT AREA OF THE BRAIN THAN PEOPLE WHO DO NOT HAVE DYSLEXIA, REGARDLESS OF INTELLECTUAL ABILITY.

When comparing good readers with poor readers, other brain image studies have shown that non-efficient readers use predominantly the speech/auditory parts of the brain while efficient readers use the visual parts of the brain.